Welcome to the Taube Lab


Our current work is focused on understanding the regulatory mechanisms that control the epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) in both normal and cancerous cells.  We work to describe the specific targets and roles of these regulatory mechanisms.  This allows us to test small molecule inhibitors of these target proteins in order to ultimately develop novel therapeutic strategies for treating cancer.

Lab team

At Baylor University, the Taube Lab consists of both undergraduate and graduate students working on a variety of projects.  Click below to learn more about the people behind the research in our lab.

Prospective Members

If you are interested in joining our lab, click the link below to learn more about appyling to do research.

Research Focus

Outgrowth of disseminated metastases is the major cause of mortality in cancer patients. In the Taube lab, we are investigating the molecular pathways and cellular properties which enable primary tumor cells to metastasize.

In normal tissues, epithelial cells form a well-structured barrier using a variety of adhesion molecules. However, aberrant activation of a conserved cellular program, termed epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), facilitates the separation of epithelial cells from this tissue. When EMT occurs in epithelial tumors, the probability of metastatic dissemination is increased.

Our current work is focused on uncovering the regulatory mechanisms which facilitate EMT in both normal and cancerous settings, describing the specific targets and roles of these regulatory mechanisms and testing small molecule inhibitors of these proteins to ultimately lead to novel therapeutic strategies.

Ongoing projects

If you are interested in a specific project, click below on the desired project.

microRNAs in Breast Cancer

microRNAs regulate cell fate through target gene down-regulation. We have uncovered microRNAs altered by epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and in triple-negative breast cancer subtypes. Through a collaboration with leading nanoparticle researchers, we are developing and testing microRNA transfer and replacement technologies.

Histone Demethylases in Cancer Cell Plasticity

Histone modifications allow plasticity in gene expression and cellular behavior. We have demonstrated that EMT drives genome-wide changes in the histone methylation landscape, particularly at H3K27me3, a silencing signal. Manipulating the localization or activity of the enzymes that deposit and remove H3K27me3 holds the potential for reducing cellular plasticity in tumors.

Small Molecules to target Cancer Stem Cells

Cancer stem cells are intrinsically resistant to most therapies. Through a collaboration with leading synthetic chemists, we are investigating and developing compounds that selectively eliminate cancer stem cells through non-apoptotic mechanisms.

Outer Membrane Vesicles and Cancer

Outer membrane vesicles are spherical lipid vesicles that result from budding of the outer membrane of various bacteria. We are working on defining the relationship between bacterial outer membrane vesicles and the biology of colonic epithelia and cancer stem cells.

Reversible EMT and Metastasis

Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) enhances metastatic dissemination while partial EMT or reversal of EMT facilitates growth of metastases. We are investigating the factors that allow for epithelial-mesenchymal plasticity and which contribute to metastasis.

MiniPharma Collaboration

The MiniPharma group is an undergraduate-lead collaboration under the guidance of Drs. Romo (synthetic chemistry), Hull (computational chemistry), and Taube (cancer biology).

The goal of the collaboration is to provide participating undergraduates with a ‘taste’ of the pharmaceutical industry with respect to development of small molecule inhibitors as potential chemotherapeutics by focusing on early stage drug lead development. See the website for more information or to get involved!

Ongoing Projects

Lab Members

collaborations

Publications

Our Team

At Baylor University, the Taube Lab consists of both undergraduate and graduate students working on a variety of projects.  Click below to learn more about the people behind the research in our lab.

News and updates

Congrats Shuxuan!

Congrats Shuxuan!

The Taube lab is proud to announce the successful Masters defense of Shuxuan Song on 3/25/21. This completes the first MSc defense from the Taube lab and Shuxuan's work on miR-203 will pave the way for great future work. Congratulations, Shuxuan!

read more
Taube Lab is More Than Pink!

Taube Lab is More Than Pink!

The Taube Lab (Joe, Keighley, Shuxuan, and Provas) plus Chemistry Grad Student and Survivor, Emily Taylor, braved the sudden snap of Waco cold weather as part of Team Taube Lab at the Waco "More Than Pink" Komen Walk 2019! This year, the initiative showcased the...

read more
The Taube Lab Turns Up the Heat in AZ at MBC 2019!

The Taube Lab Turns Up the Heat in AZ at MBC 2019!

In our first meeting since our graduate student n=3, the Taube Lab traveled outside TX(!!) to Scottsdale, AZ to the Metastatic Breast Cancer conference. It was hot, but so was the science! Lots of amazing conversations between researchers, clinicians, and advocates....

read more
2019 SusanG. Komen Walk

2019 SusanG. Komen Walk

It's that time of the year again! The Taube Lab is participating in the Susan G. Komen Waco Walk the morning of October 26th.  This is a great chance to show the Waco community (and Baylor friends/family) that there is Komen-funded breast cancer research happening...

read more
2018-19 End of Year Party

2018-19 End of Year Party

Another awesome year in the books! The lab got together at Dr. Taube's house to celebrate everyone's hard work and to send our seniors off well. We say goodbye to Emily Lin, Clayton Smith, and Samantha Pena who graduated this spring. They will...

read more
Taube Lab represents at Baylor Illuminate

Taube Lab represents at Baylor Illuminate

Dr. Taube and Keighley were invited to attend the Houston Illuminate Fundraiser, alongside Dr. Tamar Carter (a new Biology hire for Tropical Disease). Robert Huff (1st year, Pitts Lab), and Dr. Dwayne Simmons (department Chair, hearing...

read more

want to learn more?
Contact us!