GRADUATE STUDENTS

Robert Huff

Baylor University

Graduate Student

Education:

BS, MS San Diego State University, San Diego, CA

Courses Taught:

1105/1106 Modern Concepts of Bioscience Lab
BIO 1102 Introduction to Microbiology
BIO 2201 Biology of Global Health

Research Interests

Mosquitoes globally, are responsible for the transmission of countless diseases. Country borders and social walls do not deter from finding blood meal hosts in the form of humans, domesticated animals or otherwise. My research involves the study of sophisticated chemosensory receptors that allow mosquitoes to locate blood meal hosts as well as determine sources of plant nectar, resting sites, and suitable oviposition sites by detect important environmental chemical signals. Interfering with chemosensory reception can allow for increased vector surveillance, push-pull vector control, and human personal protection.

James Mann

Baylor University

Graduate Student

Education:

BS in Biology, Montclair State University, Montclair, NJ

Courses Taught:

BIO 1105/1106 Modern Concepts of Bioscience Lab

Research Interests

Mosquito-borne pathogens contribute significantly to the global burden of infectious diseases and are a continuing public health concern in the United States. Currently, our monitoring methods rely heavily on passive surveillance and clinical detection once a pathogen enters human populations. Passive surveillance efforts, however, are often limited in their effectiveness due to budget and logistical constraints, making much of the detection in developing nations rely on clinical manifestation.  My research consists of adapting cutting edge passive surveillance techniques which can be affordably fielded to tackle emerging arboviral concerns, while ultimately being adaptable to other much needed entomological detection needs.

Heidi Lindsley

Baylor University

Graduate Student

Education:

BS, Westmont College, Santa Barbara, CA

Courses Taught:

BIO 1105 Modern Concepts of Bioscience Lab

2402 Human Anatomy & Physiology of Motion & Innervation

Research Interests

My research focuses on the complex chemosensory systems of agricultural pests, including Cydia pomonella and Synanthedon myopaeformis, that dictate their behavior. I am interested in using molecular biology and electrophysiology to inform behavioral studies. Through understanding the chemosensory systems of arthropod pests, I hope to develop more holistic and sustainable methods for surveillance and control